top of page
Search
  • glyptislaw

Understanding the Central Question of Social Security Disability Cases

Social Security Disability is a federal program that provides financial assistance to individuals who have become disabled and are unable to work. The Social Security Administration (SSA) processes thousands of disability claims every year, and each claim is evaluated on its own merits. However, there is one central question that forms the basis of every disability case: Can the applicant do their past work or any work?

The Importance of the Central Question

The central question of Social Security Disability cases is critical because it determines whether or not an individual is eligible for disability benefits. If the SSA determines that the applicant can still perform their past work or any other work, they will deny the disability claim. However, if the SSA determines that the applicant is unable to perform any work, they will grant disability benefits.

Evaluating Past Work

To determine if an applicant can perform their past work, the SSA considers their work history, education, and skills. The SSA will evaluate whether the applicant can perform the same job they held before they became disabled, or if they can perform a similar job that requires the same skills and education. If the applicant can perform their past work, their disability claim will be denied.

Evaluating Any Work

If the SSA determines that the applicant cannot perform their past work, they will evaluate whether the applicant can perform any work. This evaluation is based on the applicant's age, education, skills, and residual functional capacity (RFC), which is the most they can do despite their disability. The SSA will consider whether the applicant can perform any job that exists in significant numbers in the national economy, regardless of whether the applicant has any experience in that particular job.

Appealing a Disability Claim Denial

If the SSA denies an applicant's disability claim, they have the right to appeal the decision. However, the applicant must show that the SSA made an error in their decision-making process. For example, the applicant may argue that the SSA did not evaluate their RFC correctly, or that they did not consider all of the evidence in the case.


In conclusion, the central question of Social Security Disability cases is critical because it determines whether an individual is eligible for disability benefits. The SSA will evaluate whether the applicant can perform their past work or any other work, based on their work history, education, skills, and RFC. If the applicant can perform any work, their disability claim will be denied. However, if the applicant cannot perform any work, they will be granted disability benefits. If an applicant's disability claim is denied, they have the right to appeal the decision.

5 views0 comments

Comentários


bottom of page